Pre-Congress Workshops

workshops-bar

We offer five pre-congress workshops that will be held on Aug. 23rd before the opening event of the congress. Each workshop is three hours long. Advance registration via the standard congress registration is needed for the workshops. Capacity for each workshop is limited to 30 participants. Places will be allocated on a first-come-first-serve basis.

The following workshops are offered. For details, click on the title.

Spatial Econometrics using Matlab and R

Date: August 23, 2016
Time: 9:00 – 12:00

This workshop is organized and held by James LeSage and Roger Bivand

bivand(s)2LESAGE

Aim of the workshop

It is the aim of the workshop to make participants familiar with recent developments in spatial econometrics and with the use of the respective software tools. The focus of the workshop will be on practical application rather than theoretical foundation.

Content of the workshop

This hands-on workshop will cover the use of the Matlab and R environments to show how spatial econometric models can be estimated and their output interpreted. The instructors will concentrate on more recent approaches to estimation and interpretation. Data preparation and estimation will be covered adequately, with weight on the interpretation of results. Results will also be compared across different data preparation and estimation approaches. We may not be able to cover all of cross-sectional, panel and network spatial econometrics problems, but will try to touch on all of these. Exchange of data and output objects between Matlab and R will be covered.

Format of the workshop

The workshop will be run hands-on in a PC lab; participants wishing to use their own computers should follow instructions to be given beforehand about software installation. It is not essential for users of Matlab to follow the R half of the workshop hands-on or vice-versa, but participants are encouraged to try out both systems.

Target group

Anyone with an interest in contemporary issues in applied spatial econometrics is welcome to attend.

Previous knowledge

Participants do not need intimate knowledge of Matlab and/or R, but some experience on at least one or the other may be helpful; some knowledge of contemporary issues in spatial econometrics would also be helpful. Participants might look at introductory materials such as:

  • LeSage, James P. and R. Kelley Pace, Interpreting Spatial Econometric Models, Handbook of Regional Science M.M Fischer and Peter Nijkamp (Eds.) Springer, Berlin 2014 pp. 1535-1552.
  • LeSage, James P. What regional scientists need to know about spatial econometrics, The Review of Regional Studies 2014, Volume 44, Number 1, pp. 13-32.

Communicating Research Results to the Public

Date: August 23, 2016
Time: 9:00 – 12:00

Image courtesy of stockimages at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of stockimages at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

WIFO_Foto_Oliver.Fritz

This workshop is organized and moderated by Oliver Fritz

Aim of the workshop

Research results are of little value unless they can be communicated to others. Governments and other funders alike are increasingly interested in demonstrating the social and economic returns from their investment in research and in assessing research performance. Furthermore, policy makers need to understand the implications of the results in order to design appropriate policy measures. Communicating research findings to clients, but also disseminating them to a wider public, has thus become a key task for researchers.

Content of the workshop

This workshop will bring together researchers with various institutional backgrounds to discuss communication strategies in order to identify best practice elements.

Format of the workshop

The workshop will start with a series of presentations by experienced researchers. By use of specific examples they will, on the one hand, sketch the academic elements of their research, and, on the other hand, demonstrate how these results have been communicated to target groups outside of academia. Because of the different institutional backgrounds of the presenters, these presentations will show various approaches to the problem of communicating academic research to the public. We hope that these input presentations will stimulate a lively discussion in the workshop and generate questions for a stimulating question and answer session.

Target group

Researchers who are concerned about communication of their research to the general public, administrators whose task it is to translate academic results into communication to the public, journalists specialized in science communication, etc.

Previous knowledge

No previous knowledge is required!

Open Workflow in Regional Research

Date: August 23, 2016
Time: 13:00 – 16:00

tgraaff_tcm257-117394workflow

This workshop is organized by Thomas de Graaff and Daniel Arribas-Bel and held by Thomas de Graaff

Why this workshop?

Did you ever:

  • want to use your text both for papers and websites or blogs;
  • feel constrained by Microsoft’s Word (but hesitate to adopt LaTeX);
  • want to go back to a previous version of the text but accidentally deleted it or argue with co-authors which document version was the latest;
  • think that it would be nice (and very efficient) if you could easily share and access background material of papers?

But did not know how to start with this, then this workshop might be of interest to you.

Aim of the workshop

The aim is to get regional scientists familiar with Markdown, the versioning system Git and using open repositories, in particular GitHub.

From a wider perspective, these type of tools serve brilliantly to make your research as reproducable as possible, because (i) Markdown can be read by anyone because it is just plain text, (ii) Git allows you to go back in time for your research so that you can always trace back what the past you have done and (iii) Github provides easy access for others to see what both you and the past you have done.

Content of the workshop

The workshop focuses on using a very simple markup language (Markdown) and its interaction with one of the major open repositories GitHub. Typically, Markdown is used for blogging but can as well be used for writing papers, as the Markdown syntax can very easily be transformed in HTML or LaTeX files (or to the open office format if needed). To do so, we use the RStudio application, which is probably one of the applications easiest to use out of the box and where the conversion between formats is done automatically under the hood. Note that this workshop does not deal with using R or literate programming (weaving text and code with, e.g., R’s Knitr package).

Moreover, we will deal with the versioning system Git in combination with the GitHub open repository platform. We do not aim to give all details of Git or using Git from the command line, instead we will use a desktop application with a graphical user interface with serves best as a first gentle introduction of both Git and Github.

Format of the workshop

This workshop includes a hands-on overview of specific tools that have been designed with open science and reproducibility principles in mind. This is delivered alternating presentation time with demo time, allowing participants to get a real taste of what using the tools implies and see live their advantages.

In more detail, the workshop is structured as follows:

  1. Introduction to reproducibility and open science workflow principles (20 mins.)
  2. Markdown language (45 mins.)
  3. Principles behind Git and workflow examples (60 mins.)
  4. Publication of your material on the open repository GitHub (45. mins).

Target group

The workshop is targeted toward scientists in the social sciences (e.g., economics, geography, planning)

Previous knowledge

No previous knowledge is required!

How to get your Research published

Date: August 23, 2016
Time: 13:00 – 16:00

Roberto cropped-journal-stacks-600px

This workshop is organized by Roberto Patuelli and Gunther Maier and moderated by Roberto Patuelli

Aim of the workshop

The aim of the workshop is to make participants familiar with the mechanisms and standards of academic publishing in regional science.

Content of the workshop

The workshop will cover the current mechanisms and standards of academic publishing and their future development. More specifically, the following points will be covered:

  • the role and importance of peer review
  • how to avoid desk rejection?
  • how to deal with a referee report
  • open access publishing – who has to pay?
  • citations and citation indices
  • the most important dos and don’ts of academic publishing
  • copyright and licensing
  • who does what in the publishing process?

Format of the workshop

The workshop we will begin with a series of short presentations given by editors and publishers of academic journals. They will talk about the elements of academic publishing that are essential in their view. Participants will be invited to engage in the discussion, to raise issues, ask questions, express their views, etc.

Target group

The workshop is targeted toward PhD students and young researchers who are expected to publish academic papers but need help in doing this.

Previous knowledge

No previous knowledge is required!

Signatures of Regional Science

Date: August 23, 2016
Time: 13:00 – 16:00

This workshop is organized by the Regional Science Academy

Content of the workshop

This workshop will follow the “Signatures in Regional Science” format developed by the Regional Science Academy. Input will be provided by Hans Westlund, Edward Glaeser, Manfred Fischer, Wolfgang Lutz, Folke Snickars, Alessandra Faggian, and Laurie Schintler.